Kim's Hopping Lops

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Rabbit information

This page has a variety of rabbit information please take the time to read through it. thank you. 

 
Bringing Bunny Home

What does my bunny come with? 

Each bunny leaves here with a small bag of transition feed, a small amount of hay, and a toy. 

Pedigrees are available. Please contact me if you would like a pedigree with your rabbit to confirm if he/she comes with it and to ensure it is ready along with your rabbit when you come to pick him/her up. 

And of course you are welcome to ask me questions both before and after you get your bunny. 
 

What do I need for my bunny?



Please make sure you have all the necessities at home for bunny BEFORE bunny comes home!



 







RABBIT CAGE/HUTCH


You will need a rabbit cage or hutch. Keep in mind the bunny's size (not only now if bunny is a baby, but when he/she is fully grown). You will want a cage/hutch that will still be an appropriate size even when the bunny is full grown. Also keep in mind what else will be in the cage/hutch besides the bunny as those other things will take up the bunny's space (food and water bowls, large toys, etc). A large cage/hutch is always great. You can certainly get a cage/hutch that is larger as I'm sure bunny will enjoy any the larger space - more space to lay down and strech out, and more space to hop around.


You may also want get some sort of bedding/shavings/litter for any solid bottom areas or the cage/hutch or for any pans below. What type you use is up to you - there are many different types on the market - please just make sure whichever you choose is safe for rabbits. 


Please keep in mind if it is cold out and the bunny has been used to the warm indoor temperature it is best for the bunny that he/she remain living indoors at least until it warms up in the spring, as the change to the cold can shock the rabbit. 

*If it is currently cold out the bunnies may be used to living indoors (fall or early spring - in the winter they are used to living indoors) or if it is very very hot. 

If you are unsure of whether your new bunny is currently living indoors or outdoors just ask. 




The following hutches (single, double and triple rabbit hutches) are from  Martins Animal Structures in Litiz, PA

 

RESTING MATS


I recommend getting a resting mat for the wire bottom cages/hutches. 


Tile can also work for as a resting mat and can keep them cooler during the warmer weather. 


(Please note if your  bunny is a Velveteen Lop, they are more likely to get sore hocks. Velveteen Lops' cages/hutches - if they have a wire bottom, should have at least half covered with resting mats to help prevent sore hocks.)



I recommend resting mats that can be cleaned/disinfected and reused. They may be called resting mats, foot relax pads etc. 

The type pictured below can be easily cleaned/disinfected, as well as with the holes it can allow for pee and poop to fall through rather than remain on top. 


 

RABBIT FEED


You will need to get rabbit feed. I will provide you with a small amount of the feed he/she is currently eating for you to mix in with the feed you decide to get for him/her (mixing the feed is to help the bunny transition from one feed to another).  If you would like to continue the bunny on the feed he or she is used to just ask me what type we are currently feeding. 


The rabbit feed we feed is just a plain pellet feed - it is not one of the types of feed with added colored treats. 



 

HAY


Rabbits should have hay in their diet. They can have hay all the time. 


We primarily feed timothy hay and that is what we recommend getting. There is also alfalfa and other hay mixes, however some like alfalfa could be too rich for a rabbit or fattening. 

Is there a brand name of the hay we feed - No - as we do not buy hay from the pet store etc -  we get hay in large amounts locally grown for our animals. 


Something you may also want to consider is getting some sort of a hay rack. This can help in keeping the hay up off the floor of the rabbit cage/hutch and or where the rabbit goes potty. There are a variety of different types of hay racks. Another thing to consider when getting a hay rack is getting one that can be attached to the outside of the bunny's cage/hutch for bunny to eat while in the cage/hutch. 

**Please be very careful with hay racks - they can be helpful in keeping hay for eating up of the floor or out of potty areas, but a bunny could get harmed on a hay rack if any parts are sticking out, sharp, or if bunny could in any way get stuck in it. 

 





FRUITS, VEGETABLES, HERBS, TREATS


When doing your research you may find mixed information regarding the recommended diet for a rabbit. Please do your research - you are welcome to continue with your rabbit's current diet or change his/her diet to what you feel will be best. 

Rabbit feed and hay is a part of our rabbit's daily diet. 




 If your bunny is under 6 months old getting fruits, vegetables or other treats is not yet necessary. 


When I first got rabbits I had always been told to wait until the rabbit was at least six months old or older to start feeding fruits, vegetables, or any other treats - following that has worked well for my rabbits. Some information online, etc may agree with this or differ.




When you do decide to start feeding fruits, vegetables, herbs or any other type of treats please always make sure that it is safe for rabbits to eat before feeding. 



Please also keep in mind just like for humans, certain fruits and vegetables are more or less nutritious than others.  



When you start feeding your rabbit fruits, vegetables, herbs, treats it is good to start out with just one at a time and in a small amount. That way you can easily tell whether or not the rabbit likes it as well as whether or not it agrees with the rabbit (or cause soft stool/diarrhea). 


Uneaten fruits/vegetables should be discarded as the rabbit should not eat bad fruits/vegetables and they could also draw pests. 

 





WATER AND WATER BOWL


The bunny will of course need fresh water daily. Rabbits can drink from a water bottle or water bowl. In general our rabbits primarily drink from and prefer to drink from a water bowl. Please note if you do decide to switch from a water bowl to water bottle, please keep an eye on it and make sure that bunny really is drinking from it. 



 

FOOD BOWL / FEEDER


You will need a food bowl. There are many different types that you can get. We recommend the ceramic bowls, the metal bowls, or metal feeders. The ceramic bowls, metal bowls, and metal feeders are good because the bunny should not be able to chew them up. Ceramic bowls are generally harder for a bunny to move or dump (compared to a plastic bowl and some metal, bowls). The metal bowls and feeders can be attached to the side of the cage/hutch, and should not be dumped or moved by the bunny since they will be attached to the cage/hutch.



 

TOYS


Toys are good to get for your bunny. Bunnies do enjoy playing with their toys. They may chew, roll, pick up, and, or toss their toys.  Wooden toys are great - bunnies love to chew, and chewing also keeps their teeth a healthy length. (Be sure not to give your bunny any woods that rabbits should not have, or woods that are treated with anything.) 

 

Grooming items


You should also get grooming items for your bunny. The main grooming items we recommend are nail clippers, kwik stop, a grey hound comb, and a gentle slicker brush.  Of course you get other grooming items for your bunny. No matter which breed of bunny you have you will need nail clippers so that way you can trim the bunny's nails. We recommend getting kwik stop, so that way if you accidentally cut the bunny's nail(s) too short, you can use the quick stop to stop the bleeding quickly. A grey hound comb (or similar metal comb) is good to use to comb through the bunny's hair so that way it does not get matted. When picking out a slicker brush make sure that it is a gentle one, other ones can be too hard for the bunny, and still keep in mind that you will need to brush gently as bunny's skin is thin and delicate. 







Educational resources!


Before and even after getting your bunny you can get education resources to help educate you on rabbits in general, a particular breed, feeding, housing, care, training, etc etc. Resources include books, magazines, internet, etc. There is tons of free information on the internet.


 
CARRIER

I recommend getting a carrier before getting the bunny as you will first need the carrier when you bring bunny home. 
A carrier can also be used later in life as well - going to and from a friends house, boarding, groomers, veterinarian, rabbit show, etc. 

Its is good for bunny to be safely riding in the carrier in the car ride that way you don't get distracted by what the bunny is doing or where he/she is in the car while you are driving, so he/she is not chewing on anything in the car, or going pee/poop in throughout the car. 

If you have multiple rabbits and need them separated they do make carriers divided into multiple sections. 
 

Cleaning supplies


The bunny's cage/hutch, resting mats, food and water bowl/bottle, toys, carrier etc will all need to be cleaned on a regular basis. Soap, water, and disinfectant can be used to clean and disinfect the rabbits things. Please make sure everything is rinsed well to ensure there is no soap or disinfectant remaining on the bunny's things when they are returned to the bunny. Things like the food bowl, carrier, etc should be dry when they are given back to bunny. 

 




Where do I get everything?

There are many stores that you could get bunny's new things from, from your local pet store, pet store, grocery store etc. As well as online stores as well. 


Things like fruits, vegetables, and herbs could be purchased from your local grocery store or farmer's market or you could grow them at home yourself.



The following are examples of places in Pennsylvania were you could get a rabbit hutch:


(I think they have single double hutches and a double hutch that could be used as one large hutch or divider can be placed down for two separate sections)



(They make single, double, and triple hutches)



(Double/triple hutches are great options for multiple rabbits - its a good idea to have a separate cage/hutch for each rabbit as no one can guarantee multiple rabbits will get along or for how long)


The following are also vendors that you may come across at a rabbit show, pick up from, or have items shipped. They have a lot of rabbit supplies including cages and carriers (they also make cages for multiple rabbits)



in Moscow, PA



Bechtelsville, PA 
 

You can shop online for bunny supplies as well. Sometimes this can be helpful when you find something you like in store but would like to compare price online, or see if there is a larger version. It can also be helpful if the store does not have a particular item in stock at that location. Sometimes certain things like larger cage options are easier to find online. Some websites also offer free shipping. 


Many pet stores have their own online store.


Other stores like the ones mentioned below are only online stores.








Where should I put my bunny's cage/hutch?


Most cages are meant to be kept indoors. When you get a hutch make sure you look it over well and know where you'll be keeping it. Some hutches aren't quite made properly to be put outside, so be sure to look over it well and see whether it is meant to be inside or outside. 


Make sure the bunny's cage/hutch is away from predators.  This goes for inside and outside placement of the cage/hutch. If you have other pets in your home or yard you will probably want to make sure that the bunny's cage/hutch is placed away from the area the other pets if you know or think they may go after the bunny. 


Keep in mind if the bunny is in a sunny area (whether it be inside near a window, or in an area of the yard without shade), that the bunny can get very warm. If it is already warm in the house, a warm spring day, or a hot summer day - you may have to worry about bunny overheating which can lead to death.


 

What do I need to bring with me when I pick up my bunny?


You will need to bring a carrier for your bunny to ride home in. We suggest having some sort of bedding in the cage or in the pan below the cage in case the bunny pees on the way home. 


If you have paid the 50% deposit, then the remaining 50% will be due in cash when you come to pick up your bunny.

If you have not reserved any bunny with a deposit - the full 100% will be due in cash when you take your bunny home. 

 

Taking a care ride and transitioning to the new home could potentially make the bunny a litter nervous or stressed. 


There are some things that can help in making this process go well.

Please make sure you have all the bunny necessities at home before bunny comes home.


Please have bunny's cage/hutch all set up along with fresh water and food all ready for your bunny when he/she comes home. 

If bunny seems a little stressed you can go slow and try to keep things quiet and calm for bunny to settle in the first few days. 


Spend lots of time with your new bunny! What you do with your bunny will make a big difference!


ALL BUNNIES: handle, pick up, hold, pet, groom, train, etc the rabbit - you should do these things on a regular basis so that the bunny is used to you doing those things, gets used to anything new, is cooperative for those things, as well as through this process and you spending this time with bunny, bunny should get friendlier and friendlier. 


SHOW BUNNIES: practice posing your rabbit (for each breed there is a particular way your rabbit is to be posed). When showing your rabbit it can be very helpful to the judge when evaluating your rabbit if your rabbit quickly and easily posed, as well as if he/she lets the judge pick him/her up and evaluate him/her. 

 
 

Tips

 

Cleaning Tips

  • When you clean your rabbit's cage/hutch make sure you get rid of all the waste. It would also be a good idea to dispose of the waste further away from your rabbit's cage/hutch so it does not attract pests. To clean pans, trays, or the cage you can use soap and water, or you can also use Clorox. Make sure you rise it off afterwards so your rabbit does not ingest any soap or Clorox.

Food and Water Container Tips

Metal dishes. They are also good to use in the winter if you use a water bottle because the water in it freezes and its easier to put fresh water in.

Metal feeders. These are nice to have because you can just refill the feeder, but the only problem with these is that they can get moldy if you don't clean them out.  

Ceramic crocks. They are great if your rabbit tips its food bowl over.

Water bottles. Make sure you clean these properly and keep fresh water in them, otherwise algae will appear.

Wooden crocks. These are good to have so your rabbit can chew on this crock when you can also still put their food in it.

Make sure when you clean the water bottles or crocks that you make sure there isn't soap or anything left on them that can harm the rabbit if ingested.

Hot Weather Tips


You can freeze water or soda bottles and then you can put them in the rabbit's cage for them to lay by and they can cool down that way. The bottles can also be reused.

You could also use a fan to get the air circulating, but don't have it directly towards the rabbit. 

 Tiles can be put into the cage/hutch for the rabbit to lay on and to use to keep cool.

Pest Control tips

To keep away pests away from your rabbits or they're cage, keep the cage clean, throw away trash, and if there is any fresh foods in the cage take the uneaten fresh food (such as fruits or vegetables) away after about an hour or so, so  it doesn't attract pests.


 
 

Toys for rabbits

Rabbits can get bored too, just like people. They like to chew on stuff like furniture or their cage if they don't have wooden toys. If you give them any wood make sure its untreated by chemicals. Here's a list of things that are great toys for rabbits to play with. You might not even need to buy them if you have them laying around the house.

  • Plastic keys
  • Cat toys- with bars or holes so your rabbit can pick the toy up
  • Toilet paper or paper towel rolls- you can also stuff hay inside them
  • Old books or phone books
  • Plush bunny
  • Old blanket or towel
  • Paper bag or box of hay
  • Piece of wood
  • Untreated wicker basket
  • Rolled up newspaper
  • Untreated grass mats
  • Fresh branches from an apple tree
  • Dried pine cones
  • Rubber ball
  • Chew sticks
  • Super tubes made of cardboard
  • Cat balls made from wire or rubber
  • Bird toys- wooden ones are good
  • Nylabones that are potato, fruit, or vegetable flavored
  • Rubber or plastic balls
  • Baby rattles
  • Baby teething toys
  • Small stuffed animals
  • Slinkies-make sure they are big so your rabbit doesn't get its head or paw stuck in it
  • Cleaned laundry detergent caps
  • Golf Balls

 
 

Treats for rabbits 

Fruits, Vegetables, and Plants Safe For Rabbits to Eat.


There are lots of things that rabbits can have as treats, but there are still some things that are bad for your rabbit. You can also buy things like hay or other treats like yogurt chips in stores. Here's a list of things your rabbit can have as a treat.

Good Things: 

  • Apples (no seeds)
  • Any Dark Colored Lettuce
  • Aster
  • Bananas
  • Beans
  • Blackberry
  • Blueberries
  • Basil
  • Bindweed
  • Borage
  • Bramble
  • Broccoli
  • Burnet
  • Butterbur
  • Carrots
  • Calendula
  •  Carnations
  • Carrot tops
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery leaves
  • Celery
  • Centaurea
  • Cherries
  • Chickweed
  • Cilantro
  • Chicory
  • Coltsfoot
  • Convolvulus
  • Cow Parsnip
  • Crosewort
  • Daisies
  • Dandelions
  • Dandelion greens
  • Dock (not the seedlings)
  • Frisee
  • Galega
  • Geraniums
  • Geum
  • Goose grass
  • Goutweed
  • Grapes
  • Grass
  • Green pea pods
  • Groundsel
  • Hawkweed
  • Heather
  • Hedge parsley
  • Helenium
  • Hogweed
  • Hollyhock
  • Honesty
  • Horseradish
  • Kale
  • Knapweed
  • Knotgrass
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lucerne
  • Lupines (not the seeds)
  • Maize
  • Mallow
  • Mangos
  • Marigolds
  • Marguerites
  • Maywort
  • Melons
  • Michaelmas
  • Mint
  • Mustard greens
  • Nasturtium
  • Nipplewort
  • Oranges
  • Papayas
  • Parsley
  • Parsnips
  • Peaches (no pit)
  • Pears (no seeds)
  • Peas
  • Pineapples
  • Potato peels
  • Raspberries
  • Raspberry leaves
  • Red, green, or yellow peppers
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Rosemary
  • Roses
  • Radish tops
  • Plantain
  • Sage
  • Sea Spinach
  • Sheppard's Purse
  • Sorrel
  • Sour Dock 
  • Spinach
  • Stocks
  • Strawberries
  • Strawberry Leaves
  • Sugar beets
  • Sunflowers
  • Sweet corn
  • Tares 
  •  Thistles
  • Thyme
  • Tomatoes 
  • Trefoil
  • Vetches
  • Watercress
  • Yarrow

Bad:

  • Acorns
  • Almonds
  • Apple Seeds
  • Apricot Pits
  • Asparagus Fern
  • Azalea
  • Bleeding Heart
  • Carnations
  • Cherry Pits
  • Clematis
  • Creeping Charlie
  • Daffodil bulbs
  • Daisy
  • Eucalyptus
  • Gladiola
  • Hyacinth Bulbs
  • Iceberg Lettuce
  • Iris
  • Ivy
  • Jack-in-the-Pulpit
  • Jonquil
  • Lily of The Valley
  • Milkweeds
  • Mistletoe
  • Mustards
  • Nutmeg
  • Oak
  • Peach Pits
  • Pear Seeds
  • Peony
  • Philodendron
  • Plum Pits
  • Poinsettia
  • Rhododendron
  • Rhubarb Leaves
  • Skunk Cabbage
  • Tomato Leaves
  • Tulip Bulbs

 
 

Colors

 

Agouti

The color on the top and sides of the body is to be banded and ticked. Ears are to be laced and to match the ticking color. There should be white or tan eye circles, inside the ears, nape of the neck, nostrils, underside of jowls, belly, and underside of tail. Belly may or may not have colored undercolor or lap spots. 


Faults -- Fault for poor ring definition.


Disqualification from competition -- Disqualify for complete lack of banding. 


 

Chestnut Agouti

Chestnut Agouti - The surface color on the top and sides of the body is to be a rich chestnut brown, ticked with jet black tipped guard hairs. The intermediate band is to be a well defined orange over a dark slate-blue undercolor. The chest is to be a light brown over a dark slate-blue undercolor. The top of the tail is to be black, sparsely ticked with light brown, over a dark slate-blue undercolor. The nape of the neck is to be orange, with the ears laced in black.
Eyes -- brown
Faults - Fault animals that are too light or too dark in surface color, or too light in the color of the intermediary band or undercolor. 





Chocolate Agouti -- The surface color on the top and sides of the body is to be a rich chestnut brown, ticked with chocolate tipped guard hairs. The intermediate band is to be tan over a dove-gray undercolor. The chest is to be a light brown over a dove-gray undercolor. The top of the tail is to be chocolate, sparsely ticked with tan, over a dark dove-gray undercolor. The nape of the neck is to be tan, with the ears laced in chocolate. 
Eyes -- brown.
Faults -- Fault animals that are too light or too dark in surface color, or too light in the color of the intermediary band or undercolor. 

 

Chinchilla

Chinchilla - The surface color on the top and sides of the body is to be pearl white, ticked with jet black. There is a black band at the top of the intermediary band. The intermediate band is to be a well defined pearl white over a dark slate-blue undercolor. The chest is to be a pearl white over a dark slate-blue undercolor. The top of the tail is to be black, sparsely ticked with white, over a dark slate-blue undercolor. The nape is to be white, with the ears laced in black. 
Eyes -- brown.
Faults -- Fault animals that are too light or too dark in surface color, or too light in the color of the intermediary band or undercolor. Brown patches or brownish intermediary bands are undesirable.





Chocolate Chinchilla - The surface color on the top and sides of the body is to be pearl white, ticked with dark chocolate. There is a chocolate band at the top of the intermediary band. The intermediate band is to be a well-defined pearl white over a dove gray undercolor. The top of the tail is to be chocolate, sparsely ticked with white, over a dove gray undercolor. The chest is to be a pearl white over a dove gray undercolor.  The nape of the neck is to be white, with the ears laced in chocolate. 
Eyes -- brown. 
Faults -- Fault animals that are too light or too dark in surface color, or animals with indistinct rings. 

 

Lynx

Lynx -  The surface color on the top and sides of the body is to be lilac mingled with fawn. There is a lilac band at the top of the intermediary band. The intermediate band is to be fawn over an off-white undercolor. The chest is to be fawn over an off-white undercolor. The top of the tail is to be lilac, sparsely ticked with fawn, over an off-white undercolor. The nape of the neck is to be fawn. 

Eyes -- Blue-gray.
Faults -- Fault animals lacking the lilac influence in the surface color, so as to appear fawn, or animals with indistinct rings. 

 

Opal

Opal - The surface color on the top and sides of the body is to be blue mingled with fawn. There is a blue band at the top of the intermediary band. The intermediate band is to be fawn over a medium slate-blue undercolor. The chest is to be fawn over a medium slate-blue undercolor. The top of the tail is to be blue, sparsely ticked with fawn, over a medium slate-blue undercolor. The nape of the neck is to be fawn. 

Eyes -- Blue-gray
Faults -- Fault animals that have light color on the surface, in intermediary band, or for creamy undercolor.
Disqualifications from Competition -- Disqualifty for white undercolor. 

 

Squirrel

Squirrel - The surface color on the top and sides of the body is to be blue mingled with white. There is a blue band at the top of the intermediary band. The intermediate band is to be white over a medium slate-blue undercolor. The chest is to be a light pearl over a medium slate-blue undercolor. The top of the tail is to be blue, sparsely ticked with white, over a medium slate-blue undercolor. The nape of the neck is to be white. 

Eyes -- Blue-gray

 

Broken Group

In the broken Group, the 4 points allotted for color are to be equally distributed between color and pattern. All Broken and Tri-colored animals are to have a balanced nose marking with no preference given for a butterfly over evenly balanced nose spots, a colored eye marking around each eye, and colored ears. The body color is to be evenly distrubuted in a spotted, patched, or blanket pattern. The feet are to be pure white. White toenails are preferred on Broken patterned animals. Broken patterened animals are not to be disqualified for colored or mismatched toenails. Colored spots are permissible on the legs and underside of the rabbit. The total amount of coloration on a Broken patterned animal is prefeered to not cover less than 10% or more than 70% of the entire animal.

Faults -- White on one or both ears; unbalanced nose marking; unbalanced body markings; one or more colored toenails; scattered white hairs in the colored markings.

Disqualifications from Competition -- Disqualify for the absence of a colored nose marking, complete absence of color on either ear, absence of color around either eye; eye color other than called for under respective color descriptions; foreign color spots. 

Disqualify for less than 10% pattern. Do not disqualify for white spot(s) in colored sections. 

 

Broken

Broken -- Broken consists of any recognized breed variety color in conjunction with white. Toenails are preferred to be white. Do not disqualify for mismatched or colored toenails. The eye color is to correspond with the eye color specified under the respective solid colored varieties. 


 

Tri-colored

Tri-Colored -- Tri-color consists of white in conjunction with one of the following combinations of two colors: Dense Black and Golden Orange, Blue and Golden Fawn, dark Chocolate Brown and Golden Orange, or Lilac and Golden Fawn. The colors are to be evenly distributed. Toenails should be white. 

Eyes -- Brown in Black and Chocolate varieties; Blue-gray in Blue and Lilac varieties. 


 

Pointed White Group

  • Pointed white
  • The body color is to be white to the skin, except the points. The colored points are the nose, ears, feet, legs, and the tail. The color of the points is to be as described in the respective self varieties and the color is to be deep and even. The nose marking is to come well up on the face and be well rounded, clean cut, and distinct. The markings are to be carried well up the forelegs and above the hock joint on the hind legs. The ears are to be well colored and clean at the base. Allowances should be made for developing color on juniors. The upper and lower sides of the tail are to be well colored. Toe nails are to be colored. The eyes are to have a ruby red pupil, with a lighter pink color in the iris.
    • Black pointed

    • Blue pointed

    • Chocolate pointed 

    • Lilac pointed

 

Self Group

Self pattern is to have the same color over the body, head, ears, feet, legs, and tail. 

 

Black

Black -- The surface color is to be a rich, jet black, extending well down the hair shaft. The undercolor is to be a dark slate-blue.

Eyes -- Brown. 

Faults -- Fault animals for having a brownish tinge, faded color, scattered white hairs, or a light undercolor. 

 

Blue

Blue -- the surface color is to be a rich, dark blue, extending well down the hair shaft. The undercolor is to be a medium blue. 

Eyes -- Blue-gray.

Faults -- Fault animals for having faded color, scattered white hairs, or a light undercolor. 

 

Chocolate 

Chocolate - The surface color is to be a rich chocolate, extending well down the hair shaft. The undercolor is to be a dove-gray.

Eyes -- Brown. 

Faults -- Fault animals for having faded color, scattered white hairs, or a light undercolor. 


Lilac 

Lilac -- The surface color is to be dove-gray with a pinkish tint, extending well down the hair shaft. The undercolor is to be a pale dove-gray. 

Eyes -- Blue-gray.

Faults -- Fault animals for having faded color or scattered white hairs. 


 

White, Blue Eyed 

White, Blue Eyed -- The surface color and undercolor is to be pure white. 

Eyes -- Brilliant Blue.

Faults -- Fault animals with creamy, yellow, or stained fur. 


 

White, Ruby Eyed

White, Ruby Eyed -- The surface and undercolor is to be pure white. The eyes are to have a ruby red pupil with a lighter pink color in the iris. 

Faults -- Fault animals with creamy, yellow, or stained fur. 

 

Shaded Group

 

Sable Point

Sable Point -- Color is to be a rich sepia brown on the nose, ears, feet, legs, and tail. Marking color is to shade rapidly to rich cream body color. The entire body is to be a creamy color, with white undercolor. Some slightly darker shading is permissible on the saddle, but highly undesirable. Body surface is to be a lighter than the point color to give the proper contrast. 

Eyes -- Brown.

Faults -- Blotchy color; markings too light, so as to lose the marked contrast between the dark marking color and the rich creamy body color. 



Siamese Sable

Siamese Sable -- The surface color is to be a rich sepia brown on the head, ears, back, legs, and top of the tail. The surface color will fade to a lighter sepia on the sides, chest, belly, inside of legs, and underside of the tail. Dark face color is to fade from the eyes to the jaws and all blending of color is to be gradual and free from cloches or streaks. The undercolor will be slightly lighter than the surface color. 

Eyes -- Brown. 

Faults -- Fault animals that have streaks, blotches, or poor color blending. Animals that are too light or too dark are undesirable. Scattered white hairs, or lack of darker color in the loin area is a fault. 



 

Seal

Seal -- Color is to be a rich, dark sepia (almost black) saddle, shading, to a slightly paler flanks, chest, and belly. Color is to go well down the hair shaft, with under color to match shadings throughout. Saddle color is to extend from the nape of the neck to the tail.

Eyes - Brown.

Faults -- Fault for rusty tinge. 

Disqualifications from Competition - Animals too dark to show a contrasting of shadings. 

 

Tortoise

Tortoise -- (Black, Blue, Chocolate, Lilac) Black or Chocolate color is to be a rusty orange on the saddle; Blue or Lilac color is to be fawn on the saddle; with all varieties blending into a shading of darker color over the lower rump and haunches. The Top color is to carry down and blend into a dark cream under color next to the skin. Top of tail is to match the body color. Underside of the tail is to match shadings as nearly as possible. Shading on the head is darkest at the whisker bed, blending into a lighter shade along the jaw line and darkening again at the whisker bed, blending into a lighter shade along the jaw line and darkening again at the ear base, blending up the ears to match the body color. 

Eyes - Black and Chocolate are to be Brown. Blue and Lilac are to be Blue-gray. 

Faults - Fault animals that are too light or too dark; light color on the underside of the tail is undesirable. 

Disqualification from Competition -- Disqualify animals with a pure white belly or underside of tail. 

 

Tan Pattern

Otter

Otter - (Black, Blue, Chocolate, and Lilac) The surface color of the head, outside of ears, front of forefeet, outside of hind feet, and the top sides of the body are to be the surface color and the undercolor described in the respective self variety. The Black and the Chocolate animals will have orange markings and ticking, while the Blue and Lilac animals will have fawn markings and ticking color. The belly, nostrils, eye circles, jowls, underside of tail, inside of ears, back of forefeet, and the inside of the hind feet and legs are to be creamy white, highlighted by an orange or fawn marking as it meets the self color of the body. The undercolor of the belly is to be slate blue. The triangle and the collar are to be orange or fawn. Orange or fawn ticking is to be evenly distributed on the chest, sides, and lower hind quarters.

Eyes -- Eye color is to be as described in the respective self varieties.

Faults -- Mealiness on the ears, head, or boy; faded or indistinct markings. 


 

Ticked Group

Steel -- (Black, Blue, Chocolate, Lilac) (Gold or Silver Tipping) The surface color of the body is to be black, blue, chocolate, or lilac, with color running as deep as possible. Coat is to be interspersed  with an even ticking of gold or silver over the head, ears, chest, top and sides of the body, legs, and feet. The nap of the neck and around the nostrils is to be a basic color or match the ticking color. Lap spots are permissible. The upper tail color is to match the basic color, with the surface color of the underside of the tail to match the belly color as close as possible. Lighter color is permissible on the belly. 

Eyes -- Black and Chocolate are to be Brown; Blue and Lilac to be Blue-gray. 

Faults -- Fault animals with absence of ticking on head, ear, legs, or loin and for slight ring color on the lower part of the body. 


 

Wideband

Cream

Color on the body, head, ears, feet, and top of the tail is to be a creamy beige, carried well down toward the skin. Eye circles, inside of ears, underside of jowls, underside of tail, and belley are to be white. 

Eyes -- Blue-gray.

Faults -- Brassy, lemon, or frosty gray tinge to ears, face, or feet. 

 

Fawn

Fawn -- Color is to be a rich golden color on the saddle, running down the flanks. Color is to run well down the hair shaft to a near white undercolor. Chest color is to match the flank color. Head, and top of tail are to be fawn. Eye circles, inside of ears, underside of jowls, underside of tail, and belly are to be white. 

Eyes -- Brown.

Faults -- Blotches, streaks, or smutt on the body, head, ears, or feet. 

 

Frosty

Frosty -- Color is to be light pearl, as even as possible. When blowing into the coat, a slight ring may appear at the tip of the hair shaft. Slightly darker tint on nose, ears, legs, and feet is permissible. Belly color and undercolor is to be a light pearly to white. White on underside of tail is permitted. 

Eyes -- Brown or Blue-gray.

Faults - Fault for color that is blotchy; too dark in color and showing saddle shading; yellow or stained. 


 

Orange

Orange -- The surface color of the body is to be a bright orange on the head, outside of the ears, back and the tip of the tail. The color will fade to a lighter orange on the sides and chest. Color is to extend well down the hair shaft to an off-white undercolor. The surface color of the belly (except for the orange lap spots), back of the forelegs, inside of the hind legs, top of the hind feet, and underside of the lower jaw is to be white with an off-white undercolor. The inside of the ears, nostrils and eye circles are to be creamy white. 

Eyes -- Brown.

Faults -- Fault animals with smutty color, ticking, or ear lacing. 

 

Red

Color is to be a bright reddish sorrel, but not so dark as to reach mahogany red. Color shall carry as deep down the hair shaft as possible. The belly color may be somewhat lighter in shade, approaching a deep creamy cast. White on the underside of the tail is permitted. 

Eyes -- Brown.

Faults -- Fault for light of dark ticking, when sufficient to produce a frosty or smudgy effect; white belly, white eye circles, or stray white hairs. 



 
 
 
 

FAQ

Bringing Bunny Home

  1. What does my bunny come with?

    Each bunny leaves here with a small bag of transition feed, a small amount of hay, and a toy. Pedigrees are also avaialble. 

    To be sure of what the rabbit comes with please feel free to contact us. 

  2. What kind of food should I get for my bunny?

    You should get hay and feed for the bunny. 

    We are currently feeding Producer's Pride Rabbit Feed. You will get a small bag of this feed with the bunny so you can transition him/her to whichever type of feed you decide to feed the bunny. You will also get a small amount of hay. 

    Bunnies should not eat any fruits, vegetables, or any other types of treats until they are six months old. Please also make sure that whatever fruits, vegetables, and plants you allow the bunny to eat are safe for bunnies to eat.

  3. What do I need to get for my rabbit?

    You should have a cage/hutch, water, hay, feed all ready for your rabbit when you bring him/her home. You will also want to have a water bowl or water bottle for your bunny to drink from. You will also want to have some sort of bowl or feeder for your bunny's feed. You may also want to get resting mats, toys, bedding, grooming items, educational materials, hay rack, etc at some point as well. 

  4. Do rabbits chew on things?

    Yes rabbits do chew on things therefore you do need to be careful that your rabbit does not have access to things that it should not chew on. There are a lot of toys made for rabbits so they have something to chew on and play with. Believe it or not bunnies do seem to like to have toys to play with. 

  5. What should I do before I bring my bunny home?

    You should start off by educating yourself on not only rabbits in general, but the breed of rabbit you are getting as care can differ slightly from breed to breed. You can of course educate yourself before and after bringing bunny home, but it does help to start prior to bringing bunny home that way it may help you figure out what to get for bunny and be prepared for bunny when bunny comes home. 


    You will want to make sure you have necessities like a cage or hutch for the bunny to live in. You will want to make sure that you want food and water for the bunny as well as things for the bunny to eat and drink from. 


    Items that are not necessities do not neccesarily have to be there for bunny when bunny gets home but it is nice to have everything ready. 

  6. Should I get toys for the bunny?

    Yes it is a great idea to get toys for bunnies. Bunnies love to play with toys. 

 

Breeds

  1. Do you have any Mini Lops, Mini Holland Lops, Dwarf Lops, dwarf mini Lops etc similar names?

    Sorry, but no. We raise purebred Holland Lops (and Velveteen Lops and Lionheads). We do not mix breed an Mini Lops, Netherland Dwarfs, or any other breeds. 

    Holland Lops are just refered to as Holland Lops.

    Sometimes there is some confusion. Holland Lops are a breed that is accepted by the American Rabbit Breeders Association (ARBA). Mini Lops and Netherland Dwarfs are also ARBA accepted breeds. They are two completely different breeds of rabbits. Although Mini Lops have "mini" in their name, they are actually larger than Holland Lops. Holland Lops are the smallest lop breed. Pictured below are pictures from ARBA's website showing a posed Mini Lop and the maximum show weight as well as a posed Holland Lop and its maximum show weight. It is possible for the rabbits to weight more or less than the breed's maximum weight. Meeting weight requirements is meeting part of the breed's standard. If a rabbit is over the maximum weight it would likely be disqualified when/if shown.   We strive to breed quality rabbits to meet each breed's standard. 


  2. Do you have any mini Lionheads, Dwarf Lionheads, etc similar name

    The Lionheads we have are just called Lionheads. We do not mix any other breeds in. As you can see from this picture from the American Rabbit Breeder's Association's website Lionheads are to be no bigger than 3 3/4 pounds. They are a small breed of rabbit. 

 

Other

  1. How will the rabbit be with my other rabbit/pets/children/etc?

    Getting a rabbit is similar to getting a puppy or a kitten. The animal is what you make it. If you do not work with it to get it used to things, pets, people then you cannot expect it to be good with them. 

    All rabbits here are handled on a regular basis. When rabbits are very young (such as eight weeks old when they are able to go to their new homes) it is a very good age to work with them to make them how you want them to be - friendly, used to certain things, etc. 

    How the rabbit is with children will depend on how much you work with the rabbit with children as well as how the children are with the animal. Children should be supervised around the animal to ensure that the rabbit is not getting mistreated. Also when ther are children and rabbit(s) sharing a space it is important to make sure that the children's things are all cleaned up to make sure the bunny does not eat something he/she could get caught in his/her digestive tract as it could lead to the rabbit dying. 

    We can not make any guarantees or predictions on how a rabbit will be with another pet whether it be a rabbit or different type of animal. If you do decide to let the rabbit and your other animal(s) together we do suggest that they be supervised at all times for their safety - that way if any sort of aggression or other undesired behavior occur they can be seperated imediately. 


  2. Can rabbits be litter trained?

    Yes you can train a bunny to use a litter box. 

  3. Can rabbits be trained?

    Yes you can train rabbits to do things such as litter box training, rabbit agility, rabbit hopping. 

 

Health Related Questions

  1. At what age can the rabbit be spayed/neutered?

    We reccomend that you choose a vet who experienced with rabbits to spay/neutered the rabbit as well as provide any other care. 

    What age to spay/neuter a rabbit is really a question for you rabbit experienced vet. Some vets have different age or physical requirements for spaying and neutering. 

  2. My rabbit has ______ (symptom) or my rabbit is doing ______ (abnormal behavior), has ______ ( injury), etc

    If you think your rabbit is sick or injured please contact your rabbit experienced veterinarian. I am not a veterinarian I cannot diagnose or treat your rabbit. 

    It is in the best interested of the rabbit for you to consult a rabbit experienced veterinarian. Guessing what is wrong with the rabbit, guessing treatment (possibly giving unnecessary or improper treatment, wrong dosage, etc which could lead to making the rabbit sick or die) or providing no treatment at all to the sick/injured animal and it getting worse is not in the best interest of the rabbit.

  3. Do rabbits require any vaccinations?

    As far as we know there are no required vaccinations for rabbits at this time. 

    You can contact your rabbit experienced vet to be sure. 

  4. How long do rabbits live?

    Unforetunetly the anwser to the question can vary quite a bit. From my research I have read that rabbits can live into their teens.

    We hope that all of our bunnies go to live in their forever homes. Should you decide you no longer want the bunny you got from us or can no longer keep it please return the bunny to us so we can find it a forever home. 

  5. Is the rabbit I am considering purchasing already spayed or neutered?

    No rabbit is spayed or neutered unless specified. To find out for sure please just feel free to contact us to double check.


    The majority of the rabbits sold are eight week old (or slightly older) babies. Many veteriarians will not spay a rabbit that young. We also sell rabbits that will go onto be shown - and the are not able to be shown if spayed/neutered. 


 

Lionheads

  1. How big do Lionheads get?

    Lionheads get to be about 3 3/4 pounds when full grown. 

  2. Do Lionheads need a lot of grooming?

    Lionheads have areas of short hair and long hair. The short haired areas do not need much grooming. The long haired areas do need to be groomed to prevent them from getting matted.

    You may be thinking do I need to comb through the hair every day - not necessarily. Lionheads are not like Angoras that need frequentl grooming, but hey do need some.  If you are handling your rabbit on a regular basis your should be able to feel if its' hair is starting to get matted and easily comb it out. If the hair gets too badly matted it will need to be cut out - which is not good because rabbits skin can be cut very easily which will result in a necessarly vet visit. 

    Lionheads like other breeds will need nail trimming. 

    Exactly how often the rabbit will need to be groomed can vary from rabbit to rabbit so it should be done as needed. 

 

Holland Lops

  1. How big do Holland Lops get?

    Holland Lops get to be about four pounds when full grown. 


 

Velveteen Lops

  1. How big do Velveteen Lops get?

    Velveteen Lops get to be about 5 to 6 1/2 pounds when full grown.

  2. Are Velveteen Lops showable?

    Yes Velveteen Lops are showable.

 

Bunny Care

  1. Do rabbits need to be groomed?

    Yes!

    Rabbits nails will grow and need to be trimmed (maybe every month or every other month). The more often you cut the rabbit's nails the shorter the quick will get. We do reccomend getting kwik stop just in case you cut the bunny's nails too short and they start to bleed. 


    Rabbits like other mammals shed. Brushing helps to get out those lose dead hairs. 

    For short haired rabbits hair getting matted isn't much of an issue. For longer haired rabbits it is though. It is very important to make sure your rabbit doesn't get matted. If the hair is just starting to get matted it should be easy to come out. If the hair is very matted right up to the bunny's skin that is bad and harder to get out. Hair should be kept brushed/combed out to prevent matting. If hair gets too badly matted the hair may need to be cut/shaved off which is not good because rabbits can get cut VERY easily and need immediate veterinarian care. 


  2. Can rabbits get baths? How often can I wash the rabbit?

    NO! Please do not wash the rabbit. You should be keeping the rabbit's cage/hutch/enclosure and any other area the rabbit is allowed in clean. If the rabbit's home is kept clean there should be no reason for him/her to need a bath. 


    Why shouldn't a rabbit get a bath? Rabbits can get sick as a result of a bath. Rabbits can also get stressed from getting a bath. 

    If for some reason you feel the rabbit needs a bath keeping the washing to the dirty area is better rather than washing the entire rabbit. Make sure the rabbit is completely dry and kept warm. Rabbit's skin is sensitive so be sure not to burn it if blow drying. 



  3. How often do I need to clean the rabbit's cage/hutch?

    The rabbit's cage/hutch should be cleaned as needed. 

    The less the rabbit's cage/hutch are cleaned the smellier it is. 

    If the rabbit is outside it is more likely to have flies and other pests drawn to a dirty hutch. This includes cleaning up the poop that falls onto the ground under the hutch. The cleaner the rabbit, rabbit's hutch, and surround area is the less likely there are to draw flies. 

  4. How often do I need to feed the bunny?

    How often you will need to feed the bunny will depend on how much your bunny eats as well as the size of the food container it eats from, as well as how many bunnies are housed together.

    Some food bowls are small and will hold about a day's worth of food, other food containers such as feeders for example may feed a bunny for multiple days. 

    Sometimes hay if not eaten may end up with the bunny going potty on it if it is placed down on the cage. If the bunny goes potty on the hay it should be removed.

    Fresh fruits and vegetables will go bad if not eaten as well as draw unwanted pests so it is best to remove uneaten produce before that happens. 

  5. Should I limit the bunny's food?

    As far as rabbit feed goes we do not limit feed for our rabbits. 


    If you or your veterinarian feel that your bunny has become over weight then you may want to limit the bunny's food (rabbit feed, treats).

    Through research you will read different opions on how much treats (whether they be store bought, home made, or fruits, veteables, or plants) that the bunny should or should not consume. We advise doing your research and doing what you feel is best for the rabbit. Please note too many treats could lead to an upset stomach and possibly diarrhea which can dehydrate a bunny. We advise giving small amount of treats one at a time when first introduced to see whether or not the bunny likes it and to see whether or not it agrees with the bunny's stomach. Please also check what treats are and are not okay for the bunny to eat as some can cause upset stomach, diarrhea, and or death. Different treats are also high or low in different nutrients, some treats can be high in sugar which could be like candy for the bunny which is not healthy especially in high quantities. 

    Many places you will read that hay should be given all the time and lots of it - this can be true depending on the bunny and the type of hay. We give the bunnies hay and give more after it has been eaten (rather then giving a ton of hay, and hoping they eat it rather than wasting it). Some hay such as Alfalfa can be too fattening or too high in certain nutrients for certain rabbits. Other types of hay like Timothy may be better for the average rabbit. 

 
 
 
 


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